Funded: State Policy Analysis

A Detailed Look at Each State's Funding Policies

Below, see summaries of the state’s education funding policy in each issue area. Click the Expand icon next to any summary to see more detail, if available, about that state’s policy regarding that issue area. Click the Citation icon
next to any summary to see the sources of the information regarding that issue area.
Connecticut
Funding Basics
Formula Type

Connecticut is not currently making use of its education funding formula and has not done so for several years. Connecticut has a primarily student-based funding formula. Though the formula has not been repealed or replaced, instead of calculating district’s state education aid in accordance with that formula, the state legislature now awards each district a block grant. The grant amounts are specified in legislation.

As it exists in law, Connecticut’s funding formula is primarily student-based. The formula assigns a cost to the education of a student with no special needs or services, called a base amount. It then accounts for the additional cost of educating specific categories of students both by applying multipliers to that amount to generate supplemental funding for those students and through program-specific allocations.

The categories of students that would generate supplemental funding under the Connecticut funding formula are low-income students and students enrolled in certain career and technical education programs.

source(s):

Source 1
Source 2
Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 10-262h

Base Amount

Connecticut is not currently making use of its education funding formula and has not done so for several years. Connecticut has a primarily student-based funding formula. Though the formula has not been repealed or replaced, instead of calculating district’s state education aid in accordance with that formula, the state legislature now awards each district a block grant. The grant amounts are specified in legislation.

As it exists in law, the funding formula includes a fixed base funding amount per student. The most recent base amount used in the formula was $11,525.

This means that an average student with no special needs or disadvantages would be funded at that level.

source(s):

Source 1
Source 2
Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 10-262h

 

Expected Local Share

Connecticut is not currently making use of its education funding formula and has not done so for several years. Connecticut has a primarily student-based funding formula. Though the formula has not been repealed or replaced, instead of calculating district’s state education aid in accordance with that formula, the state legislature now awards each district a block grant. The grant amounts are specified in legislation.

As it exists in law, Connecticut's funding formula expects school districts to contribute revenue to the funding of public schools. The amount each district is expected to raise is based on a combination of its property values and its residents’ income.

Under the formula, once the state calculates the total amount of funding necessary to educate students within a district, the state determines what percentage of this amount the district will be responsible to raise locally. It bases this calculation on information about the three-year average of the district’s property valuation, its per-capita income, its median household income, and the income of Connecticut’s highest-income municipality. Additionally, the state funds a minimum of 2% of each district’s necessary funding, regardless of its local wealth.

Student Characteristics
Grade Level

Connecticut is not currently making use of its education funding formula and has not done so for several years. Though the formula has not been repealed or replaced, instead of calculating district’s state education aid in accordance with that formula, the state legislature now awards each district a block grant. The grant amounts are specified in legislation.

As it exists in law, Connecticut’s funding formula does not differentiate funding based on students’ grade levels.

source(s):

Source 1

English-Language Learner

Connecticut is not currently making use of its education funding formula and has not done so for several years. Though the formula has not been repealed or replaced, instead of calculating district’s state education aid in accordance with that formula, the state legislature now awards each district a block grant. The grant amounts are specified in legislation.

As it exists in law, Connecticut’s funding formula does not provide increased funding for English language learners.

source(s):

Source 1

Student Poverty

Connecticut is not currently making use of its education funding formula and has not done so for several years. Connecticut has a primarily student-based funding formula. Though the formula has not been repealed or replaced, instead of calculating district’s state education aid in accordance with that formula, the state legislature now awards each district a block grant. The grant amounts are specified in legislation.

As it exists in law, Connecticut’s funding formula is structured to provide increased funding for students from low-income households by applying a multiplier of 1.3 to the base per-pupil amount for these students.

Under the formula, students are eligible for this supplemental funding if they qualify for free or reduced-price lunch (FRL) under the National School Lunch Program.

source(s):

Source 1
Source 2
Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 10-262h

Special Education

Connecticut does not provide funding for special education in most cases, and state funds are set aside only for extremely high-cost or atypical special-needs students.

Connecticut includes $911 for special education in its regular, per-student base amount, though the money need not be used for that purpose at the district level. Connecticut also maintains a catastrophic fund, the Excess Cost grant, to limit districts’ liability for the cost of providing services to students with extraordinary needs. The Excess Cost grant provides reimbursement when the cost of educating a student with disabilities exceeds 4.5 times the district’s net current expenditure per pupil.

The Excess Cost grant also provides funding for the special education costs of children in state agency placements and children whose parents or guardians are unable to care for them. However, the Excess Cost grant is subject to appropriation and was funded at 73 percent in 2015.

source(s):

Source 1
Source 2

Gifted

Connecticut is not currently making use of its education funding formula and has not done so for several years. Though the formula has not been repealed or replaced, instead of calculating district’s state education aid in accordance with that formula, the state legislature now awards each district a block grant. The grant amounts are specified in legislation.

As it exists in law, Connecticut’s funding formula does not provide additional resources for gifted and talented students.

source(s):

Source 1

Career and Technical Education

Connecticut provides specific funding for career and technical education programs. It does so through direct support for technical high schools and by providing a flat allocation for each student enrolled in regional agriscience centers.

The state-governed system of technical high schools is funded by a state appropriation. This appropriation was $156.7 million in FY2015. Students may also attend classes at agriscience centers, which are embedded in traditional public schools and offer vocations agricultural curricula. The state provides each center with $3,200 per enrolled student.

source(s):

Source 1

Community Characteristics
District Poverty

Connecticut is not currently making use of its education funding formula and has not done so for several years. Though the formula has not been repealed or replaced, instead of calculating district’s state education aid in accordance with that formula, the state legislature now awards each district a block grant. The grant amounts are specified in legislation.

As it exists in law, Connecticut’s funding formula does not provide increased funding based on the concentration of students from low-income households in a particular district.

source(s):

Source 1

Sparsity and/or Small Size

Connecticut is not currently making use of its education funding formula and has not done so for several years. Though the formula has not been repealed or replaced, instead of calculating district’s state education aid in accordance with that formula, the state legislature now awards each district a block grant. The grant amounts are specified in legislation.

As it exists in law, Connecticut’s funding formula does not provide increased funding for sparse districts or small schools.

source(s):

Source 1